Editing Annotation:I Saw My Love Come Passing By Me

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Matt Seattle finds an ancestral tune in an older Scottish melody called "[[Put on thy Smock on a Monday]]/Put on Your Sark on Monday" (there are various spellings), which can be found in lute manuscripts. He says, "A clear continuity of musical development can be traced through the most significant local versions in the William Dixon manuscript (1733), '''Peacock's Tunes''' (c. 1805) and here in the Clough collection (early 20th century)" [http://www.asaplive.com/archive/detail.asp?id=C0100001]. Scottish versions can also be found as "[[Drunken Wives of Carlisle (The)]]" (Robert Riddell) and "[[Gi'e the Mawking mair o't]]."  
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Matt Seattle finds an ancestral tune in an older Scottish melody called "[[Put on Your Sark on Monday]]" (there are various spellings), which can be found in lute manuscripts. He says, "A clear continuity of musical development can be traced through the most significant local versions in the William Dixon manuscript (1733), '''Peacock's Tunes''' (c. 1805) and here in the Clough collection (early 20th century)" [http://www.asaplive.com/archive/detail.asp?id=C0100001]. Scottish versions can also be found as "[[Drunken Wives of Carlisle (The)]]" (Robert Riddell) and "[[Gi'e the Mawking mair o't]]."  
 
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