Difference between revisions of "Annotation:Nagle's Last"

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'''NAGLE'S LAST.''' American, Dance Tune (2/4 time). D Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). AB. The composition is attributed to "R.B. Nagle" in '''Ryan's Mammoth Collection''', although the exact identify and information about him continues to elude at this time. The tune is listed in Ryan's as a 'jig', referring not to the familiar Irish jig in 6/8 time, but a type of syncopated 19th century old-time banjo tune, often called a 'straight' or 'sand' jig (the latter identified it as a type of clog dance that was performed on a sanded stage to facilitate foot movements).  
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'''NAGLE'S LAST.''' American, Dance Tune (2/4 time). D Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). AB. The composition is attributed to "R.B. Nagle" in '''Ryan's Mammoth Collection''', although the exact identify and information about him continues to elude at this time. The tune is listed in Ryan's as a 'jig', referring not to the familiar Irish jig in 6/8 time, but a type of syncopated 19th century old-time banjo or fiddle tune, often called a 'straight' or 'sand' jig (the latter identified it as a type of dance that was performed as as series of slides and shuffles on a sanded stage).  
 
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Revision as of 11:49, 19 February 2019

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NAGLE'S LAST. American, Dance Tune (2/4 time). D Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). AB. The composition is attributed to "R.B. Nagle" in Ryan's Mammoth Collection, although the exact identify and information about him continues to elude at this time. The tune is listed in Ryan's as a 'jig', referring not to the familiar Irish jig in 6/8 time, but a type of syncopated 19th century old-time banjo or fiddle tune, often called a 'straight' or 'sand' jig (the latter identified it as a type of dance that was performed as as series of slides and shuffles on a sanded stage).

Source for notated version:

Printed sources: Cole (1000 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; p. 84. Ryan's Mammoth Collection, 1883; p. 116.

Recorded sources:




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