Difference between revisions of "Annotation:Old Age and Young"

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'''OLD AGE AND YOUNG (NEVER AGREES).''' AKA - "[[Auld Eage and Young Never Grees the Gither]]." AKA and see "[[Bulock's Hornpipe]]/[[Bullock's Hornpipe]]." Scottish, English; Triple Hornpipe (3/2 or 6/4 time). G Minor (Young). Standard tuning (fiddle). AABBCCDD. Directions for the dance to this tune were written down in 1752 by John McGill, dancing master in Girvan, for his students. The melody, in 'Old Hornpipe' (Triple Hornpipe) time, appears in the '''Drummond Castle Manuscript''' (in the possession of the Earl of Ancaster at Drummond Castle), inscribed "A Collection of Country Dances written for the use of his Grace the Duke of Perth by Dav. Young, 1734."  Jack Campin believes "Old Age and Young" may be an adaptation of an English pipe tune from the 17th century called "[[Three Sharp Knives]]," and he suggests the English tune might have been a vehicle for some sort of ritual-combat dance. "[[Blacks Hornpipe]]" also has similarities, notes Jack. However, the tune is a variant of "[[Bulock's Hornpipe]]," a dance and 3/2 melody printed in the '''Third Volume of the Dancing Master,''' 2nd edition [http://www.izaak.unh.edu/nhltmd/indexes/dancingmaster/Dance/Play6047.htm] (1728), published in London by John Young, heir to the Playford publishing concerns.  
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'''OLD AGE AND YOUNG (NEVER AGREES).''' AKA - "[[Auld Eage and Young Never Grees the Gither]]." AKA and see "[[Bulock's Hornpipe]]/[[Bullock's Hornpipe]]," "[[Shire of Air]]." Scottish, English; Triple Hornpipe (3/2 or 6/4 time). G Minor (Young). Standard tuning (fiddle). AABBCCDD. Directions for the dance to this tune were written down in 1752 by John McGill, dancing master in Girvan, for his students. The melody, in 'Old Hornpipe' (Triple Hornpipe) time, appears in the '''Drummond Castle Manuscript''' (in the possession of the Earl of Ancaster at Drummond Castle), inscribed "A Collection of Country Dances written for the use of his Grace the Duke of Perth by Dav. Young, 1734." Young also included it in his '''Bodleian Manuscript''' (1740) under the title "<incipit title="load:shire" width=850 link="https://tunearch.org/wiki/Shire of Air">Shire of Air</incipit>."  Jack Campin believes "Old Age and Young" may be an adaptation of an English pipe tune from the 17th century called "[[Three Sharp Knives]]," and he suggests the English tune might have been a vehicle for some sort of ritual-combat dance. "[[Blacks Hornpipe]]" also has similarities, notes Jack. However, the tune is a variant of "[[Bulock's Hornpipe]]," a dance and 3/2 melody printed in the '''Third Volume of the Dancing Master,''' 2nd edition [http://www.izaak.unh.edu/nhltmd/indexes/dancingmaster/Dance/Play6047.htm] (1728), published in London by John Young, heir to the Playford publishing concerns.  
 
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Latest revision as of 22:12, 13 July 2019


X:1 T:Old Age and Young M:3/2 L:1/8 R:Triple Hornpipe B:David Young – Drummond Castle/Duke of Perth Manuscript (1734, No. 40) Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion K:Gmin G4 B3c d2 (cB)|A2F4 cB A2 (G^F)|G4 B3c d2 (cB)| A2G2g2G2 TA2 (G^F)::DG^FA G2 G,2B,4|D2 F4 B2TA2 (G^F)| DG^FA G2 G,2 B,4|D2 G4 B2TA2 (G^F)::GABG ABcA BcdB| A2F2c2F2 ABcA|GABG ABcA|BcdB|A2G2 g2G2 ABcA:| |:Gg^fa g2G2 TA4|F2f4 F2 ABcA|Gg^fa g2 G2 TA4|G2g4 G2 ABcA:|]



OLD AGE AND YOUNG (NEVER AGREES). AKA - "Auld Eage and Young Never Grees the Gither." AKA and see "Bulock's Hornpipe/Bullock's Hornpipe," "Shire of Air." Scottish, English; Triple Hornpipe (3/2 or 6/4 time). G Minor (Young). Standard tuning (fiddle). AABBCCDD. Directions for the dance to this tune were written down in 1752 by John McGill, dancing master in Girvan, for his students. The melody, in 'Old Hornpipe' (Triple Hornpipe) time, appears in the Drummond Castle Manuscript (in the possession of the Earl of Ancaster at Drummond Castle), inscribed "A Collection of Country Dances written for the use of his Grace the Duke of Perth by Dav. Young, 1734." Young also included it in his Bodleian Manuscript (1740) under the title "Shire of Air." Jack Campin believes "Old Age and Young" may be an adaptation of an English pipe tune from the 17th century called "Three Sharp Knives," and he suggests the English tune might have been a vehicle for some sort of ritual-combat dance. "Blacks Hornpipe" also has similarities, notes Jack. However, the tune is a variant of "Bulock's Hornpipe," a dance and 3/2 melody printed in the Third Volume of the Dancing Master, 2nd edition [1] (1728), published in London by John Young, heir to the Playford publishing concerns.

The melody under the "Old Age and Young" title was also published in Robert Petrie's 3rd Collection of Strathspey Reels (c. 1800), and in collections by Daniel Dow (1746) and John Anderson (1790).

Additional notes

Source for notated version: -

Printed sources : - Gore (Echoes of a Golden Age). David Young (Drummond Castle/Duke of Perth Manuscript), 1734; No. 40.

Recorded sources: -Wildgoose Records, Dave Townsend & Gill Redmond - "New Road to Alston" (2013).



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