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  • =='''Back to [[{{BASEPAGENAME}}]]'''== <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...of Gordon, who was Marshall's employer (Marshall was his Steward) and an important patron of his music. ...s Birthday" was included in the c. 1800 music manuscript copybook of musician William Patten, perhaps of Philadelphia, Pa. <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...lay & Greenberg]; Peter Chaisson, Jr. (b. 1942, Bear River, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...hompson ('''Twenty Four Country Dances for the Year 1795'''), p. 74 (appears as "The Duke of Gordon's Birthday Ball").
    5 KB (765 words) - 12:47, 17 June 2017
  • '''Back to [[{{BASEPAGENAME}}]]''' <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...port that master Cape Breton fiddler Buddy MacMaster often plays this tune paired with "[[MacKinnon's Rant]]." <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ''Source for notated version'': Donald Angus Beaton (1912-1982, Mabou, Cape Breton) [Dunlay & Greenberg]. <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ''Printed sources'': Dunlay & Greenberg ('''Traditional Celtic Violin Music of Cape Breton'''), 1996; p. 63. <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4">
    1 KB (195 words) - 23:43, 11 March 2013
  • =='''Back to [[{{BASEPAGENAME}}]]'''== <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...(Cranford/Holland): ABB (Jones, Skye): AABB (Gow, Kerr): AA'BB (Athole): AA'BB' (Perlman): AABBCC (Skinner). ...redited to that famous fiddler. The following lines appear in Alexander Whitelaw's Book of Scottish Song (1844):<blockquote> ''You've surely heard o' the famous Niel,''<br> ''I wat he was a canty chiel,''<br> ''And dearly loved the whisky, O''<br> ''And aye sin' he wore tartan hose,''<br>
    5 KB (674 words) - 03:10, 18 March 2014
  • =='''Back to [[{{BASEPAGENAME}}]]'''== <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ..., a Shetland reel version of the tune from the island of Whalsay collected in modern times still goes by the name "[[Jumping John]]" (Cooke, 1986). ...the English with his bravery (though being a drummer, exactly how he 'sounded' the tune remains a mystery, ed.) ...resembles that of "[[We Must All Wait Till My Lady Comes Home]]," from a Northumbrian musicians manuscript book dated 1816. ...own by the title "[[Auntie Mary]]," by which it is known in Ireland. The refrain below is sometimes sung, unaccompanied, in the middle of the tune: ''Up the leg of her drawers;''<br> ''She was sleeping, it was creeping,''<br>
    7 KB (1,156 words) - 00:36, 10 December 2017
  • =='''Back to [[{{BASEPAGENAME}}]]'''== <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...une, unlike anything resembling what we know as “Yankee Doodle.” A nursery rhyme exists that goes: <blockquote><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"><i> ''Lucy Locket lost her pocket,''<br> ''Kitty Fisher found it,''<br> <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...rs Opera''' of 1727) and scans to the “Yankee Doodle” tune, but any direct relationship remains speculative.
    15 KB (2,374 words) - 19:05, 11 March 2017
  • =='''Back to [[{{BASEPAGENAME}}]]'''== <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...was (the most) evident; we carried the day," which would fit with the political associations of the song. ...as derived from "[[Jumping Joan]]" (AKA "[[Joan's Placket is Torn]]"), but Bayard (1981) and Glen disagree. ...d literature. Emmerson (1971), for example, reports a description from 17th century literature of a scene in London: <blockquote><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"><i> ''Some were dancing to a bagpipe; others whistling to a Base Violin,'' ''two Fiddlers scraping Lilla burlero, My Lord Mayor's Delight, upon''
    9 KB (1,291 words) - 21:37, 8 February 2018
  • <div class="noprint"> <p><font face="Century Gothic" size="4"> Back to [[{{BASEPAGENAME}}]] </font></p> {{#lst:{{PAGENAME}}|abc}} <div style="page-break-before:always"></div> <p><font face="Century Gothic" size="2"> <div style="text-align: justify; direction: ltr; margin-bottom: 90px; margin-left: 70px; margin-right: 120px;"> ...natural accidentals). Cooke prints the following words to the tune, collected in the Shetland islands: ''All grown doss (toss?) makin me a dock an piddie.''<br>
    8 KB (1,266 words) - 19:45, 5 December 2018
  • =='''Back to [[{{BASEPAGENAME}}]]'''== <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...for “The Little House by the Stream,” in other words, the out-house. Shetland fiddler Tom Anderson (1970) wrote: ''In Waas dis tun wis caaed "Hae y ony moorit oo?" and in Eshaness an Nort Yell it wis'' ''caaed "Da Doonfaa' o' Paris". Da peerie hoose wis what some auld fold caaed an ootside'' ''water closet. Da tun is rally a variant o' an Engish tun caaed "Fay's Hornpipe" bit'' ''he's been played ower Sheland fir mony a year.'' <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4">
    2 KB (230 words) - 14:01, 3 October 2015
  • =='''Back to [[{{BASEPAGENAME}}]]'''== <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...inted to investigate their sanitary conditions. John James, in '''Continuation & additions to the History of Bradford''' (1866) recorded: ''In the report published by them, they state that there were in town and neighbourhood'' ''10,000 woolcombers, the greater part of whome were compelled to make workshops of their'' ''sleeping apartments. The report is a heart-sickening statement of the sufferings of these'' ''men. The wealthy inhabitants subscribed liberally to relieve the distress, but happily'' ''soon after this date, combing machines began to be used, and the combers were gradually''
    2 KB (368 words) - 13:11, 19 October 2015
  • =='''Back to [[{{BASEPAGENAME}}]]'''== <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...1964, just before the fiddler died, on a tape recorder). Sharp had learned some of his music from his father. <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ''Source for notated version'': John Sharp (Sharp Place, Tennessee) [Milliner & Koken]. <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ''Printed sources'': Milliner & Koken ('''Milliner-Koken Collection of American Fiddle Tunes'''), 2011; p. 203. <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4">
    2 KB (310 words) - 18:47, 6 August 2016
  • =='''Back to [[{{BASEPAGENAME}}]]'''== <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...s in Edinburgh. A second collection of Shepherd's tunes was published by the firm in the early 1800's. He died in 1812. ...most noted gamblers of his time. '''Cassell's Old and New Edinburgh, vol. 2''' (1882, p. 191) records: ''It is related of him that being one night in Stapleton's, when a messenger brought him tidings'' ''that Mrs. Scott had been delivered of a daughter, he turned laughingly to the company, and said,'' ''"You see, gentlemen, I must be under the necessity of doubling my stakes, in order to make a'' ''fortune for this little girl." He accordingly played rather deeper than usual, in consequence''
    4 KB (712 words) - 04:45, 13 December 2016
  • =='''Back to [[{{BASEPAGENAME}}]]'''== <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...MacDonald's '''Gesto Collection''' (originally taken from Alexander Campbell's publication '''Albyn's Anthology''' (1816-18}). <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...y and Greenberg]; Peter Chaisson, Sr. (B. 1929, Bear River, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...n'''), 1986; p. 42. Perlman ('''The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island'''), 1996; p. 95 (appears as "Cape Breton Wedding Reel"). <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4">
    3 KB (453 words) - 02:42, 9 December 2014
  • =='''Back to [[{{BASEPAGENAME}}]]'''== <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...and one high (part 'D'). The reel was set for pipes by Barry Shears in his '''Gathering of the Clans Collection''' (1986). <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...acMaster (Cape Breton) [Dunlay & Greenberg]; Gus Longaphie (North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> .... 95. Shears ('''Gathering of the Clans Collection, vol. 1'''), 1986; p. 53 (pipe setting. Appears as "The Wedding Reel"). <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4">
    3 KB (462 words) - 04:16, 9 December 2014
  • =='''Back to [[{{BASEPAGENAME}}]]'''== <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...'' (1821), by an unknown author to the melody "[[Will you go and marry Katie]].” The words to the song begin: ''Think on Scotia's ancient heroes''<br> ''Think on foreign foes repelled''<br> ''Wha the proud usurper quelled''<br> Chorus:<br> ''Wha wadna draw the sword''<br>
    4 KB (615 words) - 18:53, 16 February 2019
  • =='''Back to [[{{BASEPAGENAME}}]]'''== <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...o his 1840 music manuscript collection (p. 118), as did American musician M.E. Ames into his 1850 music copybook (p. 75). <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ''Source for notated version'': <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...Manson ('''Hamilton’s Universal Tune Book vol. 1'''), 1853; p. 170. Martin ('''Traditional Scottish Fiddling'''), 2002; p. 25. <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4">
    4 KB (575 words) - 02:44, 5 April 2018
  • =='''Back to [[{{BASEPAGENAME}}]]'''== <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...throw this empty bottle and wherever it lands is where I wish my final resting place to be"...He was buried on top of the wardrobe. ...for many decades after its appearance in 1838. The song "Four Nights Drunk" is sometimes sung to this tune. <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...lay & Greenberg]; Peter Chaisson, Jr. (B. 1942, Bear River, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...n'''), 1986; p. 42. Perlman ('''The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island'''), 1996; p. 95 (appears as "The Big Coffin Reel").
    5 KB (747 words) - 18:16, 12 June 2018
  • =='''Back to [[{{BASEPAGENAME}}]]'''== <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> '''REPASZ BAND MARCH.''' Old-Time, March (6/8 time). [[File:repasz.jpg|400px|thumb|left|]] ...s at Lee’s surrender. At Appomattox Court House they played the “Star Spangled Banner” and “Rally Round the Flag” alternating with a Confederate Army Band who played “Bonnie Blue Flag” and... [[File:blueridge.jpg|300px|thumb|right|The Blue Ridge Ramblers]] ...d's personnel as Preston Green (double bass), A. Judson Green and Herman Green (fiddle), and Ila Bassett (guitar). ...Repasz Band March" by Mcguire & Harkam (or Harkamp), recorded in 1929-30 (backed with "Sharpshooter's March"), their only recording.
    4 KB (572 words) - 13:19, 4 March 2017