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  • =='''Back to [[{{BASEPAGENAME}}]]'''== <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...reels "[[Buckeen (The)]]," "[[Musical Priest]]" and "[[New Bridge of Erin (The)]]." See also the Irish Highland "[[Rough Molly]]." <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...He concluded it was a local air, and "had not penetrated beyond a limited district" ('''Old Irish Music''', p. 80). <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ''Printed sources'': O'Neill ('''Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies'''), 1903; No. 481, p. 84. <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4">
    2 KB (289 words) - 02:06, 2 April 2018
  • =='''Back to [[{{BASEPAGENAME}}]]'''== <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...chanan. After numerous receptions and a grand parade in New York City from up Broadway, the diplomats returned to Japan via the circumnavigation route. [[File:Japanesetommy.jpg|400px|thumb|right|Thomas Dilward, AKA Japanese Tommy]] ...merican and to retain the large white audience base who, ironically, did not want to see a black person performing in black face. ...le of a prima donna. He became one of the few African-Americans to work with white minstrel companies. ...0, 1878. They shortly after took another tour, returning to Liverpool and opening for the winter season on December 2, 1878. ...Hague's programs boasted of comic Abe Cox singing "The Hen Convention upwards 1000 consecutive nights".
    13 KB (2,090 words) - 17:40, 28 January 2017
  • <div class="noprint"> =='''Back to [[{{BASEPAGENAME}}]]'''== {{#lst:{{PAGENAME}}|abc}} <div style="page-break-before:always"></div> <p><font face="Century Gothic" size="2"> <div style="text-align: justify; direction: ltr; margin-bottom: 90px; margin-left: 70px; margin-right: 120px;"> ...led "an old air") "Wha wid eat wi' ither folk fan th[e]y hae meat at hame man" in his manuscript version, and directed it be played "Boldly." ...quently published them. Carnie himself tells of the incident in his '''Further Aberdeen Reminiscences''' (1904, p. 91-92):
    6 KB (931 words) - 01:55, 25 June 2017
  • =='''Back to [[{{BASEPAGENAME}}]]'''== <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...nings (fiddle). AB (Howe, Wilson): AABB (most versions): AA'BB (Perlman): AA'BB' (Hart & Sandell, Miskoe & Paul). ...'s Hornpipe (2)]]." The hornpipe appears in a number of 19th century English musicians' copybooks as "[[Egg Hornpipe]]." ...e. There are stylistic similarities, to be sure, although "Roger" is a distinct melody from "Fisher's." ...lly French at Sudbury, Suffolk, in which the same bars reflect the 'original' of 'Fisher's' more closely." ...d "[[Soldier's Joy]]") were favorite tunes for the last figure of square dances in western New York state into the early 20th century. ...estination for a number of Arranmore families), and the Donegal fiddle tradition can be heard in his playing.
    21 KB (3,020 words) - 01:39, 3 June 2018
  • =='''Back to [[{{BASEPAGENAME}}]]'''== <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...ncy Act of 1811 effectively passed many royal responsibilities to his son George, the Prince of Wales. ...ll Room''' (London, 1816, p. 109). In America the melody was contained in '''Riley’s Flute Melodies, vol. 3''' (New York, 1820-1825, p. 19). <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ''Source for notated version'': <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...000 Jigs and Reels'''), c. 1867; p. 45. Raven ('''English Country Dance Tunes'''), 1984; p. 147. Wilson ('''Companion to the Ball Room'''), 1816; p. 109.
    2 KB (317 words) - 20:13, 6 January 2017
  • =='''Back to [[{{BASEPAGENAME}}]]'''== <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ..., in George Willis's '''Compleat Tutor for the German Flute''' (London, 1792, printed by Thomas Cahusac). ...New Romney, Kent, c. 1799), William Brown (Romford, England, c. 1797), and Rev. R. Harrison (Temple Sowerby, Cumbria, c. 1815). ...id of the Mill (1) (The)]]." An early American country dance by the same name is printed in Morrison. <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ''Source for notated version'': Lefty Head via George Penk (Portland, Oregon) [Songer]. <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4">
    4 KB (578 words) - 01:58, 14 May 2018
  • =='''Back to [[{{BASEPAGENAME}}]]'''== <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...g was written by an Edinburgh music seller named John Hamilton to Cooper’s melody. His lyric begins: <blockquote><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"><i> ''Farewell, ye fields an' meadows green! ''<br> ''The blest retreats of peace an' love;'' <br> ''Aft have I, silent, stolen from hence, ''<br> ''With my young swain a while to rove. ''<br>
    6 KB (887 words) - 18:59, 26 January 2017
  • =='''Back to [[{{BASEPAGENAME}}]]'''== <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...768). Of interest may be Cruickshank's drawing of "Tars Carousing," from one of Dibdin's song folios. ...nce of the title in American musicians' manuscript copybooks. See note for "[[Annotation:Cuckoo's Nest (4) (The)]]" for more. <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ''Source for notated version'': <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ''Printed sources'':
    3 KB (386 words) - 16:37, 6 December 2017
  • =='''Back to [[{{BASEPAGENAME}}]]'''== <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...s have called it "Paddy O'Whack." The title is from a song by the same name, the chorus of which goes: ''Where seven praties weight a ton.''<br> ...d-19th century music manuscript collection (vol. 3, p. 73) as "Pig under the Pot", perhaps an air instead of a jig. ...ltine’s '''Instructor in Martial Music''' (Exeter, N.H., c. 1810), and Gilford’s '''Gentleman’s Pocket Companion for the Flute or Violin''' (New York, c. 1802). ...llection (Tyneside, 1841), Rev. R. Harrison collection (Temple Sowerby, Cumbria, c. 1815), and others. ...ed as having commonly been played at Orange County, New York, country dances in the 1930's (Lettie Osborn, New York Folklore Quarterly).
    8 KB (1,077 words) - 01:13, 10 January 2018
  • =='''Back to [[{{BASEPAGENAME}}]]'''== <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ...cer (Leeds, Yorkshire, 1831), James Winder (Lancashire, c. 1835), and, in America, Gurdon Trumbull (Stonington, Conn., 1801) and Ann Winnington (New York, 1810). ...ndoran Highland (The)]]” and “[[Niel Gow's Wife (1)]]”). He called the set “The Thistle and Shamrock.” ...poser Frédéric Kalkbrenner (1785-1849) in his setting of "[[Robin Adair]]", toward the end of the sixth variation. <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4"> ''Source for notated version'': <p><font face="garamond, serif" size="4">
    3 KB (540 words) - 02:35, 25 February 2018
  • <div class="noprint"> <p><font face="Century Gothic" size="4"> Back to [[{{BASEPAGENAME}}]] </font></p> {{#lst:{{PAGENAME}}|abc}} <div style="page-break-before:always"></div> <p><font face="Century Gothic" size="2"> <div style="text-align: justify; direction: ltr; margin-bottom: 90px; margin-left: 70px; margin-right: 120px;"> ...s using interchangeable phrases, the most recognizable of which usually is associated with the verses: Pope's Arkansas Mountaineers (1927) also sang:
    11 KB (1,763 words) - 05:51, 8 February 2019