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'''JENNY'S WELCOME TO CHARLIE''' ("Fáilte Sineid Roim Catal" or "Fáilte Shinéad roimh Chathal"). AKA and see "[[Jennie and the Weazel]]," "[[Jennie and the Weaver]]," "[[Jenny Picking Cockles]]," "[[Highway to Holburn (The)]]." Irish, Reel. D Aeolian (Dm): D Dorian (Cowdery, Miller, Vallely): D Mixolydian (O'Neill/1001): D Mixolydian/Major (Breathnach, Kennedy, Mitchell): D Mixolydian/Dorian (Cranitch): D Major (Mulvihill, O'Neill/1850). Standard tuning (fiddle). ABC (Breathnach, Kennedy): ABCD (Mitchell, O'Neill): ABB (Williamson): AABBCCDD (Brody, Cowdery, Cranitch): AA'BBCCDD (Vallely): AABB'CCDD'EEFF (Mulvihill). Versions vary widely in tonality, from the major through mixolydian and dorian modes, to minor-also number of parts varies greatly. The title of this Jacobite reel refers to the Scottish pretender Bonnie Prince Charlie, also for a time an Irish hope. Gearoid Ó hAllmhurain, for one, believes Jenny may refer to Jean Cameron, Prince Charlie's reputed mistress. There were two Jean or Jenny Camerons involved in the Rising of 45, but it appears to be Whig propaganda that Jenny led the Camerons into battle and that she was romantically involved with Charlie.  There are stories still that Charlie's supposed dalliance with Jenny distracted him from his Rebellion (similar stories are told of other defeated leaders-Napoleon and Santa Anna, for example). Cowdery (1990) identifies the melody as a "further development" of the identifying phrases of the old ballad "[[Boyne Water (1)]]." Caoimhin Mac Aoidh maintains the tune (in four parts) was associated with County Donegal in the past, though it has been disseminated to most of Ireland in the present. Earle Hitchner and Don Meade, in liner notes to Brian Conway's CD "First Through the Gate," note: "'Jenny's Welcome', a demanding four-part tune recorded in the 1930's by Hughie Gillespie (1906–1986, born in Ballybofey, Co. Donegal), has often been played by fiddlers vying for the All-Ireland championship at Fleadh Cheoil competitions." "[[Long Note (The)]]" is a related tune, as is "[[Jennie and the Weazel]]." Randy Miller says his version, most of whose parts are in Dorian mode, is a County Kerry setting based on the playing of fiddler Paddy Cronin, who resided in Boston for many years.   
 
'''JENNY'S WELCOME TO CHARLIE''' ("Fáilte Sineid Roim Catal" or "Fáilte Shinéad roimh Chathal"). AKA and see "[[Jennie and the Weazel]]," "[[Jennie and the Weaver]]," "[[Jenny Picking Cockles]]," "[[Highway to Holburn (The)]]." Irish, Reel. D Aeolian (Dm): D Dorian (Cowdery, Miller, Vallely): D Mixolydian (O'Neill/1001): D Mixolydian/Major (Breathnach, Kennedy, Mitchell): D Mixolydian/Dorian (Cranitch): D Major (Mulvihill, O'Neill/1850). Standard tuning (fiddle). ABC (Breathnach, Kennedy): ABCD (Mitchell, O'Neill): ABB (Williamson): AABBCCDD (Brody, Cowdery, Cranitch): AA'BBCCDD (Vallely): AABB'CCDD'EEFF (Mulvihill). Versions vary widely in tonality, from the major through mixolydian and dorian modes, to minor-also number of parts varies greatly. The title of this Jacobite reel refers to the Scottish pretender Bonnie Prince Charlie, also for a time an Irish hope. Gearoid Ó hAllmhurain, for one, believes Jenny may refer to Jean Cameron, Prince Charlie's reputed mistress. There were two Jean or Jenny Camerons involved in the Rising of 45, but it appears to be Whig propaganda that Jenny led the Camerons into battle and that she was romantically involved with Charlie.  There are stories still that Charlie's supposed dalliance with Jenny distracted him from his Rebellion (similar stories are told of other defeated leaders-Napoleon and Santa Anna, for example). Cowdery (1990) identifies the melody as a "further development" of the identifying phrases of the old ballad "[[Boyne Water (1)]]." Caoimhin Mac Aoidh maintains the tune (in four parts) was associated with County Donegal in the past, though it has been disseminated to most of Ireland in the present. Earle Hitchner and Don Meade, in liner notes to Brian Conway's CD "First Through the Gate," note: "'Jenny's Welcome', a demanding four-part tune recorded in the 1930's by Hughie Gillespie (1906–1986, born in Ballybofey, Co. Donegal), has often been played by fiddlers vying for the All-Ireland championship at Fleadh Cheoil competitions." "[[Long Note (The)]]" is a related tune, as is "[[Jennie and the Weazel]]." Randy Miller says his version, most of whose parts are in Dorian mode, is a County Kerry setting based on the playing of fiddler Paddy Cronin, who resided in Boston for many years.   
 
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The multi-part settings of "Jenny's Welcome..." are an elaboration on the older two-part reel "[[Jenny Picking Cockles]], which in turn is likely to have been preceded by the jig and song "[[The Hag with the Money]]."
 
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Revision as of 09:59, 7 February 2019

Back to Jenny's Welcome to Charlie


JENNY'S WELCOME TO CHARLIE ("Fáilte Sineid Roim Catal" or "Fáilte Shinéad roimh Chathal"). AKA and see "Jennie and the Weazel," "Jennie and the Weaver," "Jenny Picking Cockles," "Highway to Holburn (The)." Irish, Reel. D Aeolian (Dm): D Dorian (Cowdery, Miller, Vallely): D Mixolydian (O'Neill/1001): D Mixolydian/Major (Breathnach, Kennedy, Mitchell): D Mixolydian/Dorian (Cranitch): D Major (Mulvihill, O'Neill/1850). Standard tuning (fiddle). ABC (Breathnach, Kennedy): ABCD (Mitchell, O'Neill): ABB (Williamson): AABBCCDD (Brody, Cowdery, Cranitch): AA'BBCCDD (Vallely): AABB'CCDD'EEFF (Mulvihill). Versions vary widely in tonality, from the major through mixolydian and dorian modes, to minor-also number of parts varies greatly. The title of this Jacobite reel refers to the Scottish pretender Bonnie Prince Charlie, also for a time an Irish hope. Gearoid Ó hAllmhurain, for one, believes Jenny may refer to Jean Cameron, Prince Charlie's reputed mistress. There were two Jean or Jenny Camerons involved in the Rising of 45, but it appears to be Whig propaganda that Jenny led the Camerons into battle and that she was romantically involved with Charlie. There are stories still that Charlie's supposed dalliance with Jenny distracted him from his Rebellion (similar stories are told of other defeated leaders-Napoleon and Santa Anna, for example). Cowdery (1990) identifies the melody as a "further development" of the identifying phrases of the old ballad "Boyne Water (1)." Caoimhin Mac Aoidh maintains the tune (in four parts) was associated with County Donegal in the past, though it has been disseminated to most of Ireland in the present. Earle Hitchner and Don Meade, in liner notes to Brian Conway's CD "First Through the Gate," note: "'Jenny's Welcome', a demanding four-part tune recorded in the 1930's by Hughie Gillespie (1906–1986, born in Ballybofey, Co. Donegal), has often been played by fiddlers vying for the All-Ireland championship at Fleadh Cheoil competitions." "Long Note (The)" is a related tune, as is "Jennie and the Weazel." Randy Miller says his version, most of whose parts are in Dorian mode, is a County Kerry setting based on the playing of fiddler Paddy Cronin, who resided in Boston for many years.

The multi-part settings of "Jenny's Welcome..." are an elaboration on the older two-part reel "Jenny Picking Cockles, which in turn is likely to have been preceded by the jig and song "The Hag with the Money."

Sources for notated versions: "McFadden" [O'Neill], referring to Chicago fiddler John McFadden, originally from Carrowmore, just north of Westport, County Mayo—McFadden came from a musical family, and although he did not read music, he had a trained ear and a "copious repertory", and was known for his ability to apply variation sets to tunes; Kathleen Collins [Brody]; Nicholas Markey (County Meath, Ireland) via piper Seamus Ennis [Williamson]; piper Seamus Ennis, 1959 (Dublin, Ireland) [Breathnach]; piper Willie Clancy (1918–1973, Miltown Malbay, west Clare) [Mitchell]; Tommy O'Connor (Ballyhahill, County Limerick) [Mulvihill]; Paddy Cronin (Co. Kerry) [Miller].

Printed sources: Breathnach (CRÉ 2), 1976; No. 261, p. 135. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; p. 146. Cowdery (The Melodic Tradition of Ireland), 1990; Ex. 45, p. 118. Cranitch (Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; No. 81, p. 156. Kennedy (Fiddler's Tune-Book: Reels & Rants, Flings & Fancies), 1977; No. 78, p. 20. Miller (Fiddler's Throne), 2004; No. 180, p. 114. Mitchell (Dance Music of Willie Clancy), 1993; No. 144, p. 114. Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 144, p. 39. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; p. 142. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903; No. 1456, p. 270. O'Neill (Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems), 1907; No. 687, p. 122. Vallely (Learn to Play the Fiddle with Armagh Pipers Club), 197?; No. 45, p. 40. Williamson (English, Welsh, Scottish and Irish Fiddle Tunes), 1976; p. 89.

Recorded sources: Bellbridge Records, Bobby Casey – "Casey in the Cowhouse" (1992. Originally recorded 1959). Claddagh CC53CD, Robbie Hannan – "Traditional Music played on the Uilleann Pipes." Claddagh CC39, Willie Clancy – "The Pipering of Willie Clancy, vol. 2" (1983). Cló Iar-Chonnachta CICD098, Tola Custy and Cyril O'Donoghue – "Setting Free." Coleman Music Center CHC 009, fiddler Andy Davey (1928-2005) – "The Coleman Archive, vol. 2: The Home Place" (2005). Comhaltas Ceoltoiri CL13, Tommy Peoples. Front Hall 09, How To Change a Flat Tire – "A Point of Departure." Gael-Linn, Paul O'Shaughnessy – "Slogadh 78." Gael-Linn CEF 022, Sean Keane – "Seoda Ceoil 2" (1969). Green Linnet SIF 1075, Eileen Ivers – "John Whelen & Eileen Ivers: Fresh Takes" (1987). Green Linnet SIF 1101, Eileen Ivers – "Playing with Fire: The Celtic Fiddle Collection" (1989). Outlet 3002, Paddy Cronin – "Kerry's Own Paddy Cronin" (1977). Shanachie 29002, "Kathleen Collins". Shanachie 79001, De Danann – "Selected Jigs, Reels, and Songs." Shanachie 78012, "The Best of Joe and Antionette McKenna." Smithsonian Folkways SFW CD 40481, Brian Conway – "First Through the Gate" (2002). Tara Records, Paddy Glackin – "Doublin'".

See also listings at:
Alan Snyder's Cape Breton Fiddle Recording Index [1]
Jane Keefer's Folk Music Index: An Index to Recorded Sources [2]
Alan Ng's Irishtune.info [3]
thesession.org [4]
Hear Hugh Gillespie's recording at Capeirish.com [5]
Hear numerous recorded versions at the Comhaltas Archives [6]




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