Don't Get Trouble in Mind

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DON'T GET TROUBLE IN MIND. American, Song Air. Mike Yates (2002) calls this "a very simple tune that follows a widely employed metrical pattern." He identifies variants as a laughing song from the late 19th century called "Quit That Ticklin' Me", and "Run, Molly, Run." It was recorded in the 78 RPM era by the Ward Family of Galax, Virginia, at least twice; once as the Bogtrotters Band and once in 1927 as Crockett Ward and his Boys (Okeh 45304). Fields Ward waxed it in 1929 for Gennett, who did not issue the recording, although it did finally appear on Historical HLP 8001. The song was recorded in 1946 for the Library of Congress from the playing and singing of banjo player and raconteur Rufus Crisp (1880-1955) of Floyd County, eastern Kentucky. The Mudcat site [1] gives the following sets of words:

DON'T GET TROUBLE IN YOUR MIND
As recorded by Frank Blevins & His Tar Heel Rattlers, 1928.

Days are breaking, breaking in my heart.
Think I am a poor boy, I got an old sweetheart.
Don't get trouble in your mind; don't get trouble in your mind.

I went to see that girl of mine, get my business right.
She says you are the meanest boy that ever lived or died.
Don't get trouble in your mind; don't get trouble in your mind.

Again I went to see that girl; she said she loved me some,
Threw her arms around me like a grapevine around a gum.
Don't get trouble in your mind; don't get trouble in your mind.

When you see that gal of mine, tell her if you can:
When she goes to make her bread, to wash her nasty hands.
Don't get trouble in your mind; don't get trouble in your mind.

When you see that girl of mine, something you must tell her:
If she don't like my way o' doin', to get some other feller.
Don't get trouble in your mind; don't get trouble in your mind.

The last time I saw that girl, she's standin' in the door,
Johnny's arms around her and a baby on the floor.
Don't get trouble in your mind; don't get trouble in your mind.

Trouble, trouble, trouble in my mind.
If trouble don't kill me, sure I'll never die.
Don't get trouble in your mind; don't get trouble in your mind.

And a similar set:

DON'T GET TROUBLE IN YOUR MIND
As recorded by J. E. Mainer's Mountaineers, on "Classic Sides 1937-1941"

Went to see my baby, standin' in the door,
Shoes an' stockin's in her hand, her bare feet on the floor.

CHORUS:
Don't get troubled in your mind, your mind; don't get troubled in your mind.
When you see that gal o' mine, don't get troubled in your mind.

to see my baby; thought I'd do some slippin'.
I kissed 'er right smack in the mouth; her doggone nose was leakin'.

When you see that gal o' mine, tell her if you can,
When she goes to make her bread, to wash her nasty hand.

Now she's gone and left me; shore do wish her well.
Hope she's got her another man, then she can go to—uhh.

Went to see Miss Suzy; she's standin' in the door,
Shoes and stockin's in her hand, her feet all over the floor.


Source for notated version:

Printed sources:

Recorded sources: Folkways LP 2342, Rufus Crisp (Kentucky). Musical Traditions MTCD0231, Sam Connor & Dent Wimmer (Copper Hill, Floyd County, Va.) - "Far on the Mountain, Vols. 1 & 2" (2002).




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