Fight About the Fireside

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X:1 T:Fight about the Fire side M:C L:1/8 R:Reel B:Robert Mackintosh – “A Fourth Collection of New Strathspey Reels, also some B:Famous old Reels” (1804, p. 15) N:Dedicated to the Dutchess [sic] of Manchester N:Robert “Red Rob” Mackintosh (c. 1745-1808) was a Scottish violinist and N:composer active in Edinburgh at the end of the 18th century. Originally from N:Tullymet, near Pitlochry, Perthshire. He moved to London in the last decade N:of his life. Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion K:C c|GcEc D(ddc)|GcEc GcEc|FdEc D(ddB)|cGAF ECC:| e|c/c/c (gc) edde|c/c/c (gc) acgc|f(aTge) dcde|GAcd {cd}e2 (de)| c/c/c (gc) edde|c/c/c (gc) acgc|faeg dcde|GAcd {f}e2 dc||



FIGHT ABOUT THE FIRESIDE. AKA and see "Road to Arisaig," "Strathspey in Memory of Angus Allan Gillis," "White Clover." Canadian, Strathspey; Scottish, Reel. Canada, Cape Breton. C Major: D Major (Goodman, Rook). Standard tuning (fiddle). AB (Surenne): AAB (Athole, Goodman, Gow, Lowe): AABB (Dunlay & Greenberg, Dunlay & Reich, Honeyman, Kerr). A so-called 'double-tonic' melody. Fight About the Fireside is also the name of a Scottish country dance, first printed in the Gow's Five Favourite Country Dances for 1822. "Glenburnie Rant (The)" has become associated with the this country dance, as it is often the first tune in the medley played as accompaniment, and thus "Glenburnie Rant" is sometimes (erroneously) called "Fight About the Fireside." The tune was included by musician John Rook (Waverton, near Wigton, Cumbria) in his 1840 manuscript collection (p. 208), as well as by County Cork cleric and uilleann piper Canon James Goodman in his large mid-19th century music manuscript collection (vol. iii, p. 166). In the Cavendish Music Books No. 22: Album of National Dances there is a note that this was the favorite reel of the Prince Regent.


Additional notes
Source for notated version : - Joe Cormier (Cape Breton & Boston) [Dunlay and Reich], Alex Gillis and Alcide Aucoin (Cape Breton) [Dunlay & Greenberg].

Printed sources : - Cole (1000 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; p. 46. Dunlay & Greenberg (Traditional Celtic Violin Music of Cape Breton), 1996; p. 68. Dunlay & Reich (Traditional Celtic Fiddle Music of Cape Breton), 1986; p. 66. Gow (Complete Repository, Part 1), 1799; p. 19. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; p. 15. Kerr (Merry Melodies, vol. 2), No. 79, p. 11. Joseph Lowe (Lowe's Collection of Reels, Strathspeys and Jigs, book 2), 1844–1845; p. 15. Robert Mackintosh (A Fourth Collection of New Strathspey Reels, also some Famous old Reels), 1804; p. 15. Ryan's Mammoth Collection, 1883; p. 74. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; p. 63. Surenne (Dance Music of Scotland), 1852; p. 31.

Recorded sources : - PLP4-1012, Joe Cormier – "The Cheticamp Connection" (appears as "Strathspey in Memory of Angus Allan Gillis"). Decca 14006 (78 RPM), Alex Gillis and Alcide Aucoin/The Inverness Serenaders (appears as "White Clover"). Celtic 57 (SCX 57), The Five MacDonald Fiddlers – "The Fiddlers of Cape Breton" (various artists. Appears as "Road to Arisaig"). CDAB-3 26-1, Kinnon Beaton – "Cape Breton Fiddle I."

See also listing at :
Alan Snyder's Cape Breton Fiddle Recording Index [1]



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