Going to Donnybrook

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X:1 T:Going to Donnybrook M:6/8 L:1/8 R:Jig S:O'Neill - Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems (1907), No. 280 Z:AK/Fiddler's Companion K:G E|DGG BGG|AGG GBd|efg dBG|AGA BGE| DGG BGG|AGG GBd|efg dBG|AGG G2:| |:f|gfg efg|edB def|gfg eag|fdd d2f|gfg efg| edB def|1 gfe dBA|BGG G2:||2 gba gfe|dBA BGE||



GOING TO DONNYBROOK (Ag imteacd go d'i domnac broc). AKA and see "Off to Donnybrook." Irish, Double Jig. G Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). AABB'. See also the 3rd part of the "King's Jig (2)." The melody appears as "Off to Donnybrook" in Ryan's Mammoth Collection (1883), and, even earlier, in the Gunn Family manuscripts of County Fermanagh, c. 1865, as "Humors of Donnybrook (2)." The jig has frequently been recorded by Cape Breton fiddlers.

Additional notes

James Early

Source for notated version: - "Early" [O'Neill]. Chicago Police Sergeant and uilleann piper James Early was a member with Francis O'Neill of the Chicago Irish Music Club, and a highly esteemed musician by O'Neill and his peers. He was often the playing partner of fiddler John McFadden. Early hailed from Cloone, near Carrigallen, County Leitrim, born in the late 1840's where he learned to play the flute and fiddle, although he stopped playing when he came to America, still a boy. Later in life (after he joined the police force) he took up the pipes under the tutelage of his friend and relative, James Quinn, and it is through Early that many of Quinn's tunes made their way to O'Neill and were preserved.

Printed sources : - O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; p. 67. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903; No. 1086, p. 204. O'Neill (Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems), 1907; No. 280, p. 61.

Recorded sources: -

See also listing at:
Alan Snyder's Cape Breton Fiddle Recordings Index [1]
Alan Ng's Irishtune.info [2]
Jane Keefer's Folk Music Index: An Index to Recorded Sources [3] [4]



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