Good for the Tongue

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X: 10441 T: GOOD FOR THE TONGUE C: %R: reel B: Elias Howe "The Musician's Companion" Part 1 1842 p.44 #1 S: http://imslp.org/wiki/The_Musician's_Companion_(Howe,_Elias) Z: 2015 John Chambers <jc:trillian.mit.edu> M: C| L: 1/8 K: Bb % - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - F2 |\ Bcde (fBAB) | gBaB b(BAB) | GeFd EcDB | cdec BAGF | Bcde (fBAB) | gBaB b(BAB) | GeFd EcDB | dcBA B2 :| |: (de) |\ (fBAB) (gBAB) | babg gfed | g^fgd edeG | cdec BAGF | Bcde (fBAB) | gBaB b(BAB) | GeFd EcDB | dcBA B2 :| % - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -



African-American keyed bugle player.

GOOD FOR THE TONGUE. AKA and see "Blueskin's Hornpipe," "Clog double," "Jenkin's Hornpipe," "Stoney Steps (The)," "Stony Steps (The)," "Washington Hornpipe (1)." American, Breakdown or Hornpipe. USA; New England, Nebraska, Missouri. B Flat Major (Christeson, Cole, Ford, Howe, Phillips, White): A Major (Silberberg, Songer). Standard tuning (fiddle). AB (Silberberg): AABB (most versions). The title and the melody's presence in Ryan's Mammoth Collection (1883) suggests this was once employed as a cornet or keyed-bugle showpiece, or a brass band tune (as was, for example, "Ned Kendall's Hornpipe"), a genre popular in the mid-19th century, and originally meant to be played on an instrument that featured the technique of 'tonguing' to articulate passages. However, Scottish sources ("Jenkins' Hornpipe") seem to predate brass band usage, and it appears as an untitled tune in a manuscript from the North East of England dating the the early 19th century [1], set in the key of 'C'. The manuscript is signed "C.J. Surtees" but entries are in many hands. It was printed by London publisher James Alexander in his Alexander's 50 New Scotch & Irish Reels & Hornpipes (c. 1826), attributed to the mysterious "W.J." who is credited with a half-dozen tunes in the publication, and who may be the editor of the volume. The volume was edited by a "professional musician," who is presumably "W.J." himself. Missouri fiddler Cyril Stinnett (1912–1986) thought it one of the more difficult tunes in his repertoire. Northwest U.S. fiddlers have changed the original key to A major. See Montreal fiddler Joseph Allard's (1873-1947) version as "Clog double." See also the closely related tune "White Fish in the Rapids."


Additional notes



Printed sources : - Alexander (Alexander's Fifty New Scotch & Irish Reels and Hornpipes), c. 1826; No. 35, p. 17 (as "Blueskin's Hornpipe"). R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddler's Repertory, vol. 2), 1984; No. 37, p. 25. Cole (1000 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; p. 92. Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; p. 96. Howe (The Musician's Companion, vol. 1), 1842; p.44. Howe (1000 Jigs and Reels), c. 1867; p. 80. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes, vol. 2), 1995; p. 195. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; p. 85. Ryan's Mammoth Collection, 1883. Silberberg (Fiddle Tunes I Learned at the Tractor Tavern), 2002; p. 54. White's Unique Collection, 1896; No. 142, p. 25.

Recorded sources : - Folkways FD 6530, Old Grey Goose - "Maine Country Dance Music and Song" (1980. Learned from Otto Soper of Orland, Maine. Sopher played over the radio in the 1930's with a band that went by two names, Soper's Old Timers and Andy and the Farmboys). Great Meadow Music CD 2008, Bob McQuillen and Friends – "Old New England" (1996). Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association 106, Bob Walters – "Drunken Wagoneer" (1993) Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association 104, Cyril Stinnett - "Salty River Reel" (1992). Laurie Andres – "Fantastic Hornpipe" (1991. learned from Bob Childs and Greg Boardman, who had the tune from Maine dance musician Otto Soper).

See also listing at :
Jane Keefer's Folk Music Index: An Index to Recorded Sources [2]
Hear Bob Walter's home recording at Slippery Hill [3]



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