Running Footman's Jigg

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X:1 T:Running Footman's Jigg B:Walsh M:6/4 L:1/8 K:D A2| d3 c B2 A3 G F2| E3 F G2 F3 E D2| D2 F2 A2 D2 F2 A2| D2 F2 A2 A4 A2| d2 A2 d2 d2 A2 d2| d2 A2 d2 c4| d3 c B2 A3 G F2| E2 e2 A2 c2 d6:| |:c2 d2 e2 e2 f2 e2 |e2 d2 c2 B4 A2| A2 c2 e2 A2 c2 e2 |E2 A2 ^G2 A6| d3 c B2 A3 G F2| E3 e d2 c3 B A2| d2 f2 a2 e2 f2 d2 | e2 A2 c2 d6:|



RUNNING FOOTMAN(‘S JIG). English, Country Dance Tune (6/4 or 6/8 time). D Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). AB. The melody was printed by London publisher John Walsh in several of his collections, including Lancashire Jigs, Hornpipes, Joaks, etc. (c. 1730), Caledonian Country Dances, The Compleat Country Dancing-Master (1731) and The Compleat Country Dancing-Master, 4th edition (1754). The “Running Footman” was also printed in John Simpson's The Delightful Pocket Companion, vol. 2 (c. 1750), and Daniel Wright's Wright's Compleat Collection of celebrated country Dances (London, 1740, published by John Johnson). It is one of the "missing tunes" from William Vickers' 1770 Northumbrian dance tune manuscript.

A running footman to William, Duke of Cumberland. Pencil & watercolor, mid-18th century.

A 'running footman' was a liveried servant employed to run ahead of their master’s coaches, paying any tolls in advance and clearing a safe passage ahead. Alternatively, the 'running footman' also referred to a servant to wait at table, attend the door, and run various errands (as in a palace); a four-legged stand to hold fireplace utensils; and an archaic term for a foot soldier.

"Running Footman" may be the tune entered as "Running Fitter" in the index of Northumbrian musician William Vickers' 1770 Northumbrian dance tune manuscript. Unfortunately it is one of the tunes that is in the missing section of the collection.

Additional notes

Source for notated version: -

Printed sources : - Knowles (A Northern Lass), 1995; p. 35.

Recorded sources: -



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