Rutland Jig (The)

Find traditional instrumental music
Jump to: navigation, search




X:1 T:Rutland Jig, The M:6/8 L:1/8 R:Jig B:Stephen Grier music manuscript collection, Book 3 (1883, No. 77) B: http://grier.itma.ie/book-three#?c=0&m=0&s=0&cv=27&z=-2482.7737%2C-180.4899%2C7571.5474%2C3576.6667 Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion K:Dmix dAG F2D|AFD EF/G/E|dAG F2D|GEC EF/G/E| dAG F2D|fg/a/f g2e|dcB c2A|GEC EF/G/E|| f2d dfd|afd ef/g/e|f2d dfd|gec ef/g/e| f2d dfd|Bc/d/B c2A|GAB c2A|GEC EF/G/E|| F2D F2D|F2D EF/G/E|F2D F2D|GEC EF/G/E| F2D F2D|F2D EF/G/E|GAB cBA|GEC EF/G/E||



RUTLAND JIG, THE. AKA and see "Humors of Dublin (2) (The)." Irish, Jig (6/8 time). D Mixolydian. Standard tuning (fiddle). ABC. "Rutland Jig" is contained in the 1883 music manuscript collection of Stephen Grier (c. 1824-1894) of Newpark, Bohey, Gortletteragh, Co. Leitrim. According to Fr. John Quinn, the tune is a version of Carolan's "Mary O'Neill (1)," printed in Dublin in 1726 by the Neals under the title "Humors of Dublin (2) (The)" and reprinted with the same title in London by John Walsh (c. 1733).

According to Seán Donnelly[1], "Rutland Jig (The)," is a shortening of "Duchess of Rutland's Jig (The)." The latter name appears in a list of tunes in an obituary for German-born Jewish hammered dulcimer player Isaac Isaacs, who entertained in Dublin for thirty years in the latter 18th century, and who had an excellent reputation. The existing tune "Humors of Dublin" was re-named for Mary Isabell Manners (1756-1831), "complacent wife" of Dublin's famous madam, Mrs Leeson's favorite client, Charles Manners, 4th Duke of Rutland AKA "Honest Charlie," lord lieutenant of Ireland in the 1780's. Donnelly notes that "The Rutland Jig" was known in County Leitrim in the 20th century (c.f. Grier).

The song "Buck Whaley's Departure" was written to the "Rutland Jig" in 1788. See note for "Round the World for Sport" for more on this interesting story.


Additional notes










Back to Rutland Jig (The)

0.00
(0 votes)




  1. Seán Donnelly, "A German Dulcimer Player in Eighteenth-Century Dublin", Dublin Historical Record Vol. 53, No. 1 (Spring, 2000), p. 81.