Sailor Springs

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X:1 T:Sailor Springs N:From the playing of fiddler Charlie Fulk (1960-1980, Ingraham, N:Clay County, south-central Illinois) N:Sailor Springs is a village also in Clay County, Ill., pop. 95 in the N:2010 census. M:C| L:1/8 R:Quadrille Q:"Quick" D:Pickaway Press, Charlie Fulk - Dear Old Illinois (2007) D:https://www.slippery-hill.com/recording/sailor-springs Z:Transcribed by Andrew Kuntz K:C "*"+slide+[e4e4] f2 gf|e2 cB A2A2|G2 Bd [B2g2]g2|g^fga g2=f2| +slide+[e4e4] f2 gf|e2 cB A2A2|G2 Bd [B2g2]g2|[E3c3][Ec]- [E2c2]|| ef|gagf e2 c2|F2F2[GA]-[A2A2]A|G2 Bd g2g2|g^fga g2e=f| gagf e2 c2|F2F2[GA]-[A2A2]A|G2 Bd g2g2|[E4c4][E4c4]|| P:Substitutions: "*"+slide+[e4e4] f3 (g/f/|e2)cB A2A2||



SAILOR SPRINGS. American, Quadrille or Reel (cut time). USA, Illinois. C Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). AB. "Sailor Springs" is from a 1976 field recording of fiddler Charles "Charlie" Overton Fulk (1916-1980) of Ingraham, Clay County, south-central Illinois. It is a quick but stately piece, perhaps part of a quadrille set. The title, "Sailor Springs", refers to another small community in Clay County (population just 95 in the 2010 census). The town had some notoriety in the 19th century for its medicinal mineral springs, opened to the public in 1878. A local 1884 history of the area noted hopefully: "As the springs became more widely known, invalids and pleasure seekers came from a distance. To supply all those who came, cottages have been erected till now about 200 guests can be accommodated in comfort, and each year the number of visitors is rapidly increasing" [1]. The fashion for mineral spring bathing collapsed in the early 20th century, and the village reverted to a rural economy.


Additional notes



Printed sources : - Garry Harrison and Jo Burgess(Dear Old Illinois), 2007; p.

Recorded sources : - Pickaway Press, Charle Fulks - Dear Old Illiniois (2007. Various artists).




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  1. History of Wayne and Clay Counties, Illinois, 1884, p. 481.