She's a Daughter of Daniel O'Connell

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X:1 T:She's a Daughter of Daniel O'Connell M:3/4 L:1/8 R:Air Q:”Slow” S:O’Neill – Music of Ireland (1903), No. 44 Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion K:G Bc | d2c2A2 | G2D2E2 | F2 (G4 | G2) z2 GA | B2B2B2 | c2A2G2 | (F6 | F4) Bc | d2c2A2 | G2D2E2 | F2 (G4 | G2) z2 A2 | B2c2d2 | A2G2G2 | (G6 | G4) || GA | B2c2d2 | e2c2c2 | f2 (d4 | d2) z2 dc | B2B2B2 | c2A2G2 | (F6 | F2) z2 Bc | d2c2A2 | G2D2E2 | F2 (G4 | G2) z2 A2 | B2c2d2 | A2G2G2 | (G6 | G4) ||



SHE'S A DAUGHTER OF DANIEL O'CONNELL (Is Ingean Domnaill ui Connaill i). AKA "Is ingean Domnaill Uí Connaill i." Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). G Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). AB. Paul de Grae finds that Francis O'Neill had written to A.P. Graves that the air was "uncommon if not unknown," a curious assertion when the air is fairly well known bing the vehicle for "Maid with the Bonny Brown Hair," and, in modern times, Con Fada O Drisceoil's "Spoons Murder." Further, de Grae finds variants in P.W. Joyce's "High-Flier (The)", and, in minor mode, "Woods of Kilmurray (The)"[1].

Additional notes

Source for notated version: - Chicago Police Sergeant James O’Neill, a fiddler originally from County Down and Francis O’Neill’s collaborator [O’Neill].

Printed sources : - O'Neill (O’Neill’s Irish Music), 1915; No. 75. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903; No. 44, p. 8.

Recorded sources: -



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  1. Paul de Grae, "Sources of Tunes in the O'Neill Collections", 2017.