John Ochiltree

Find traditional instrumental music
Jump to: navigation, search



Back to John Ochiltree


X:1 T:John Ochiltree M:6/8 L:1/8 R:Air B: William Thomson - Orpheus Caledonius, vol. II (1733, No. 48, p. 198) B: https://digital.nls.uk/special-collections-of-printed-music/archive/91482038 N:Thomson (c. 1695-1753) was a Scottish singer and folk song collector N:who lived in London for most of his adult career. Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion K:Ddor d f2 e2d|g e2{d}^c2 c|d>ef {f}e2d|d^c d A2 =c| AF A GE G|_B2B B2B|A2A GE G|G2 c G3|| P:”For the German Flute” K:Ador e g2 f2 e|a f2 {e}^d2d|e>fg {g}f2e|e^de B2=d| BGB AFA|c2c c2c|B2B AFA|A2d A3||




JOHN OCHILTREE. Scottish, Air (6/8 time). D Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). An anonymous variation sonata appearing in Scottish dancing master and musician David Young's MacFarlane Manuscript (1740, vol. 2, No. 9) in air-gavotta-minuet-jig form. The melody (as a song) also appears in William Thomson's Orpheus Caledonius vol. II (London, 1733) and David Rutherford printed it as a country dance in Twenty Four Country Dances for the Year 1758 (London, p. 4). One set of words to the air appear in Orpheus Caledonius, reprinted by Robert Chambers in Scottish Songs (1829), and go:

Honest man, John Ochiltree!
Mine ain auld John Ochiltree!
Wilt thou come ower the muir to me,
And do as thou wast wont to do?
Alake, alake! I wont to do!
Ochon! I wont to do!
Now wont to do's away frae me,
Frae silly auld John Ochiltree.

Honest man, John Ochiltree!
Mine ain auld John Ochiltree!
Come ance out ower the muir to me,
And do but what thou dow to do.
Alake, alake! I dow to do!
Walaways! I dow to do!
To hoast, and hirple ower my tree,
My bonny muir-powt, is a' I may do.

Walaways, John Ochiltree!
For mony a time I tell'd to thee
Thou rade sae fast by sea and land,
And wadna keep a bridle-hand;
Thou'd tyne thy beast, thysell wad die,
My silly auld John Ochiltree.
Come to my arms, my bonnie thing,
And cheer my up to hear thee sing;
And tell me ower a' we hae done,
For thochts maun now my life sustain.

Another version of the song appears in poet Allan Ramsay's Tea-Table Miscellany (1719-20):

Honest man, John Ochiltree:
Mine ain auld John Ochiltree,
Wilt thou come o'er the moor to me,
And dance as thou was wont to do.
Alake, alake, I wont to do!
Ohon, ohon! I wont to do!
Now wont to do's away from me,
Frae silly auld John Ochiltree.

Honest man John Ochiltree,
Mine ain auld John Ochiltree:
COme anes out o'er the moor to me,
And do but what thou dow to do.
Alake, alake! I dow to do!
Walaways! I dow to do!
To whost and hirple o'er my tree,
My bonny moor-powt, is a' I may do.

Walaways! John Ochiltree,

For mony a time I tell'd to thee,
Thou rade sae saft by sea and land,
And wadna keep a bridle hand,
Thou'd tine the beast, thy sell wad die,
My silly auld John Ochiltree.
Come to my arms, my bonny thing,
And chear me up to hear thee sing;
And tell me o'er a' we hae done.
For thoughts maun now my life sustain.

Gae thy ways, John Ochiltree:
Hae done! it has nae fa'r wi' me.
I'll set the beast in through the land,
She'll may be fa' in a better hand;
Even sit thou there, and drink thy fill,
For I'll do as I wont to do still.


Additional notes







See also listing at :
See a standard notation transcription of David Young's version in the MacFarlane Manuscript (c. 1740) [1]



Back to John Ochiltree

0.00
(0 votes)