Mountain Hornpipe (1) (The)

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X:1 T:Mountain Hornpipe [1] M:4/4 L:1/8 S:Grant Lamb - a Manitoba fiddler K:G (DE/2F/2)| G2 gd edBA| G2 gd edBG| DGBG DGBG|DGBd cBAB| G2 gd edBA| G2 gd edBd| gfgd ecAF | G2 GF G :| |:z | B3 c d2 d2 | cBcd e4 | A2>B2 cBcA | Ggfa g2 ge | dBdg eceg | fdfa gfge | dBdg ecAF | G2 GF G2 :|]



MOUNTAIN HORNPIPE [1], THE. AKA and see "Ice on the Pumphandle," "Mountains of Kerry (The)," "Old Skeddadalink" (W.Va. title), "Doug's Favorite," "Douglas's Favorite Hornpipe," "Shape's Hornpipe" (Pa.), "Hopple's Tune" (Pa.), "Reel Maginot," "Woody's Hornpipe." English, Irish, American; Hornpipe: Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; southwestern Pa., W.Va. G Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). AABB. A hornpipe, perhaps of Irish provenance, although with a long history in the United States. Samuel Bayard (1981), who found several versions in the repertory of southwestern Pennsylvania fiddlers, considered it to be "at least a little older" than the 1840's or 1850's, perhaps knowing it was published by Elias Howe in Boston as early as 1851 (it continued to be published in Howe's publications and later derivatives for some ninety years). It was in the repertoires of West Virginia old-time fiddler Melvin Wine (who called it "Old Skeddadalink") and Maine fiddler Mellie Dunham (the elderly Dunham was Henry Ford's champion fiddler in the late 1920's). An untitled version ("Reel (26)") was published by Samuel Bayard in Hill Country Tunes (1944), collected in 1943 from the playing of David Gilpin, a southwestern Pa., fiddler.

Montreal fiddler Isidore Soucy (1899-1963) included his irregular version of the tune in his "Gigue irlandaises (1)" as the last in a medley of three tunes on his first recording, in 1925.

Additional notes

Sources for notated versions: - Alan Jabbour (Washington, D.C.) [Krassen]; David P. Gilpin (Connellsville, Pennsylvania, 1943) [Bayard, 1944]; Samuel Losch (Juniata, Pa., 1930's), William Shape (Greene County, Pa., 1944), Hogg (Pa., 1948) [Bayard, 1981]; James Bryan (Ala.) [Phillips].

Printed sources : - Bayard (Hill Country Tunes), 1944; No. 83 (appears as "Reel, #83"). Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 258A-C, pp. 219-220. Cazden (Dances from Woodland), 1955; p. 18. Cole (1000 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; p 102 (appears as "Douglas' Favorite"). Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; p. 71 (appears as "Doug's Hornpipe"). Hardings Original Collection (1928) and Harding Collection (1915), No. 11. Howe (School for the Violin), 1851; p. 34. Howe (Diamond School for the Violin), 1861; p. 44. Krassen (Appalachian Fiddle), 1973; p. 85. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903; No. 1745. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes, vol. 2), 1995; p. 209. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; p. 189. White's Unique Collection, No. 104.

Recorded sources: -Edison 51236 (78 RPM), 1923, John Baltzell (appears as last tune of "Durang Hornpipe Medley") {Baltzell was a native of Mt. Vernon, Ohio, the same home town as minstrel Dan Emmett (d. 1904). Emmett returned to the town in 1888, poor, but later taught Baltzell to play the fiddle}. Voyager 312, Grant Lamb- "Manitoba Fiddler" (1974).

See also listing at:
Jane Keefer's Folk Music Index: An Index to Recorded Sources [1]
Hear/see "Old Skeddadalink" played on fretless banjo on youtube.com [2]



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